3 Up Gaps That Must Fill

3 Up Gaps That Must Fill

When it comes to the stock market, never say never because every possible market event will happen at least once. Especially events you least expect.

Here’s one that is positive for your portfolio.

There are specific events that have been proven through over 200 years of actual stock market history.

In fact, this one is proven beyond a shadow of a doubt and you can make money with it very soon:

Up & Down Gaps Close 91% Of The Time!

For those of you who do not know what a gap is, and how important it is, here is a simple explanation.

Let’s now look at the current chart below:

As you can see, the  Standard Poor’s 500 chart above reveals 3 Up Gaps in price that, at a better than 91% chance will eventually fill to the downside. The reason that pushes this to the ranks of “it will now LIKELY move sooner than later is the fact that all 3 Up Gaps occurred within 3 months and this is almost unprecedented.

Watch out below. We are not trying to scare you, quite the opposite, we are giving you a kind warning.

So lets add it up:

“A 91% chance of filling every market gap up or down for the last 200 years?” 

Prepare for anything because the last time more than 3 Gaps were closed within only 5 weeks was February 2020! 

What is hard to imagine is that the rise lasted 1,458 days for the 5 Up Gaps to be created between December 2016 and February 2020. It took exactly 22 Corona-Crash days to close (fill all 5) to the downside.

The point is clear. This is not a question of will the current 3 Up Gaps fill, but when will they fill and will you avoid the decline?

You must be ready to avoid the coming decline unless you have 1,458 more days to wait for it to come back to break even.

As we already demonstrated to our members on January 18, 2020 with a market Red Light exit signal, InterAnalyst will warn and protect our members when it turns down again.

P/E Ratio: The Over/Under Value Market Indicator

P/E Ratio: The Over/Under Value Market Indicator

In section 5 of yesterday’s post I quickly introduced an investment topic called the Shiller P/E (CAPE).

This is the most significant, proven, long-term directional indicator that has ever existed for long-term stock market direction.

It is not a daily or weekly trading system but can certainly help you know which direction the market is moving as it reaches a top or bottom.

The Shiller (CAPE) P/E Ratio is now famous, yet forgotten because most Financial Advisors either keep it under wraps or have never been taught its true power. Essentially, a high P/E means Over Priced stocks.

The chart below is the Shiller P/E Ratio dating back to 1880.

As you can see, the median P/E since 1880 is 15.77 and that is enough data to understand that historically investors over the last 140 years have recognized that a share of company stock should be roughly 16 times its earnings.

In clearer terms, if a company made $1, its share price should be $15.77.

Horrible Investor Value

Now, take a look at the chart above to view the Over Valued and Under Valued P/E Levels.

When the Shiller (CAPE) is 20 and above, stock prices are too high for a long-term buy and hold strategy. Performance will likely remain poor for up to 20 years.

Most importantly, any time the P/E rose above 20, it eventually and ALWAYS back down below 10, typically below 7, before it bottomed.

As you can see in the image below, when the Shiller P/E Ratio rises above 20, it can take many years for values to get back down. The year of the great depression brought the P/E back in line within 4 years. However, outside of great depression, it takes up to 20 years or longer to get stocks back to a fair price.

Our current period dating back to the 1999 top is still declining back to fair prices. Here’s the point: Buying the stock market when the CAPE P/E Ratio if the S&P500 index is above 20 is an immense risk of little to no return on your money.

Great Investor Value

Now, when the Shiller (CAPE) hits 10 or below, then it is an amazing time to Buy and Hold the market indexes or any stock of value. Historically, a P/E of 4 – 7 will allow you to to perform extremely well over the next 7 – 20 years. In fact, you will perform 10,000% – 30,000% or better. That is what buying at the right P/E price point will do for you.

For a little clarification, had you invested $10 in the S&P500 on January 1, 1985 (P/E ratio of 10.36), today you would have over $3,500! Not bad for timing with the Shiller P/E!

So lets look to see if this is a great time to be a Buy and Hold Investor like in 1985?

Reviewing the same chart (below) modified to include colors indicating when to invest for optimum Buy and Hold performance.

Avoid Buy & Hold investing if the Shiller P/E value is within the Red area.  This area has proven to deliver returns similar to bank accounts if you deduct inflation from the return. Not good.

However, if the Shiller P/E ratio value is within the Green area, you can buy the S&P 500 Index and make significant long term returns.

Great Investor Value

Now, when the Shiller (CAPE) hits 10 or below, then it is an amazing time to Buy and Hold the market indexes or any stock of value. Historically, a P/E of 4-7 will allow you to to perform extremely well over the next 7 – 20 years. In fact, you will perform 10,000% – 30,000% or better. That is what buying at the right P/E price point will do for you.

For a little clarification, had you invested $10 in the S&P500 on January 1, 1985 (P/E ratio of 10.36), today you would have over $3,500! Not bad for timing with the Shiller P/E!

So lets look to see if this is a great time to be a Buy and Hold Investor like in 1985?

Reviewing the same chart (below) modified to include colors indicating when to invest for optimum Buy and Hold performance.

Avoid Buy & Hold investing if the Shiller P/E value is within the Red area.  This area has proven to deliver returns similar to bank accounts if you deduct inflation from the return. Not good.

However, if the Shiller P/E ratio value is within the Green area, you can buy the S&P 500 Index and make significant long term returns.

The point of this entire article is to let compare where we are today relative to 140 years of real data. 

Significantly, every single time there “was a significant crash or two” associated with the decline back to value. Here is reality:

At a Shiller P/E Ratio of 26.97, we are not nearly as high as 44 in 1999. But, just to get back to a normal Shiller P/E bottoming area below 10, the stock market will have to drop by 62% from here!

27 – 10 = 17

17 / 27 = -62% 

If you are a Buy & Hold Investor, you should know that based on history dating back to 1880, you are NOT  positioned for strong buy and hold returns. In fact, you are dreadfully positioned right now though 2032. 

Can you afford a 45%-60% decline back to value. Its progressing to that as you read this historical lesson.

You must find a strong, well proven, historically accurate system that allows you to invest when the markets are moving up, on the sideline when the markets head down, and back in when they head up again.

You will do vastly better that Buy & Hold if own a Monthly, Weekly, or Daily professional trade signal platform that will help guide you through the next 20 years. Your membership will put you light years ahead of everyone else who is Buying and Holding at precisely the wrong time as history has proven.

We will help get you to where you want starting today following simple Green and Red lights.

The P/E Ratio Is Screaming At You

The P/E Ratio Is Screaming At You

The P/E Ratio Is Screaming At You so today I am laying the groundwork for tomorrows post. So lets get started and learn about the P/E Ratio.

The price-to-earnings ratio (P/E ratio) is the ratio for valuing a company that measures its current share price relative to its per-share earnings. P/E ratios are used by investors and analysts to help determine the relative value of a company’s shares in an apples-to-apples comparison.

It can also be used to compare a company against its own historical record or to compare aggregate markets against one another or over time. The ubiquitous P/E ratio is typically the first metric investors learn on their journey towards financial freedom.

One of the biggest mistakes I see new investors make is their use of the P/E ratio because the P/E ratio has some significant drawbacks that you should be aware of before we teach you the profitable and proven benefits of this indicator.

Today, lets cover 5 points the ratio will not teach us and tomorrow we will learn precisely how it can tell us which direction the markets are going shortly. 

What the P/E Ratio Teaches us is vitally important so first we have to quickly learn what it does not teach us. 

1. Price is not a good measure for what a company is worth

The first issue with the P/E ratio is the ‘P’ part of the formula. Typically, the ‘P’ stands for the share PRICE which corresponds to the market capitalization of the company. But there’s a problem with using only market capitalization. Market cap only represents the contribution of equity shareholders. Which means it doesn’t include any debt or cash on the balance sheet.

If you want to know the true worth of a company surely you need to include debt and cash? To do so, it’s better to use an alternative such as enterprise value which is the market cap, plus total debt, minus cash. Often, the market cap of a company will be similar to the enterprise value but sometimes it can be vastly different. GE, for example, has a market cap of over $52 billion but it’s enterprise value is more than double that at $111 billion. If you use market cap you get a lower P/E ratio than if you used the enterprise value. So by substituting market cap with enterprise value the formula immediately becomes more useful.

2. EPS is not a good measure of company earnings

Just like the ‘P’ in ‘P/E’ is inadequate, the ‘E’ part of the formula is also misleading. Typically, the ‘E’ represents earnings per share which is usually reported as the trailing twelve month EPS or in other words the net profit over the last 12 months.

The problem here is that EPS or net profit contains many different components and is therefore not necessarily a good indication of the real profitability of a company. For example, net profit is reported after accounting procedures such as depreciation and amortization.

These techniques are often used to massage the books, by inflating profits and pushing out losses. On top of that, net profit may include interest and tax payments, both of which are individual to the company and not necessarily useful for observing what profit a business is actually making.

So instead of using EPS or net profit, a better option is to use EBITDA which stands for earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation. In other words, it is the true earnings before all those components have made their mark. And so, instead of using the trusted P/E, which is market cap divided by EPS you can see it’s better to use a more comprehensive formula such as enterprise value divided by EBITDA.

3. P/E ratios are lagging metrics

Now we’ve looked at the limitations of the formula, you should understand that P/E ratios (like most financial metrics) are inherently misleading because they are lagging metrics. To put it plainly, when you plug in the earnings part of the formula you are typically using past data, typically the trailing 12 month EPS (or EBITDA).

Clearly, the problem with this is that the last 12 months of earnings are not necessarily predictive of the next 12 months. For example, consider a company that has a market cap of $1 billion and in the last twelve months reported net profit of $100 million. That would give it a P/E ratio of 10 which historically would make it cheap and an attractive buy.

But consider that the last 12 months were, in fact, a stand out year for the company based on a series of unusual economic events unlikely to occur again. And in fact, the company usually makes only $20 million a year, not $100 million. With a net profit of only $20 million, the P/E ratio would be 50 which is historically a high and unattractive multiple.

In other words, the stock is priced at 10 times last year’s earnings but 50 times next year’s earnings. The stock either needs to decline in price to bring the P/E back to a more realistic level or it needs to grow its earnings in line with last year’s stand-out numbers.

Either way, you can see that buying the stock based on last year’s earnings is a flawed strategy because it doesn’t consider future earnings or the historical earnings average.

4. P/E cannot be used for unprofitable companies

Divide any number by a negative and you end up with another negative. And so is the problem when using the P/E ratio for any company that reports negative earnings (of which there are many!). Consider, for example, the market cap for Uber which is currently $56 billion. And consider the latest 12-month EBITDA which was -$8.2 billion. 56 divided by -8.2 results in a P/E ratio of -6.8. So if low P/E ratios are good then Uber must be outrageously cheap.

But of course, we know it isn’t because the negative P/E doesn’t tell us anything. All it tells us is this company hasn’t reported any profit in the last 12 months. In other words, the P/E ratio for any unprofitable company is meaningless, except perhaps to say that this is a stock that may not provide any return unless it can soon get itself profitable. In a similar vein, the P/E ratio has limited ability when used to compare across industries.

Low growth industries such as conglomerates or utilities typically command lower P/Es which cannot be compared to other industries such as tech stocks which often have high P/Es or negative P/Es. Essentially, the P/E ratio is limited in its ability whenever the main consideration is growth or profitability.  

5. The Shiller P/E Ratio

The cyclically-adjusted price-to-earnings (CAPE) ratio of a stock market is one of the standard metrics used to evaluate whether a market is overvalued, undervalued, or fairly-valued.

This metric was developed by Robert Shiller and popularized during the Dotcom Bubble when he proved (correctly) that equities were highly overvalued. For that reason, it’s also casually referred to as the “Shiller PE”, meaning the Shiller variant of the typical price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio of stock.

It’s most commonly applied to the S&P 500, but can be and is applied to any stock index. The main benefit is that it is one of several broad valuation metrics that can help you determine how much of your portfolio should reasonably be invested into equities based on the current relationship between the price you pay for them and the value you get in return in the form of earnings.

Robert Shiller demonstrated using 130 years of backtested data that the returns of the S&P 500 over the next 20 years are strongly inversely correlated with the CAPE ratio at any given time.

In other words, whenever the CAPE ratio of the market is high, it means stocks are overvalued, and returns over the next 20 years will likely be poor. In contrast, whenever the ratio is low, it means the stocks are undervalued, and returns over the next 20 years will likely be good.

Are we under, over, of fairly valued in May 2020?

In tomorrows post we will analyze precisely where we are valued as a market and how InterAnalyst can help you maximize your portfolio growth now.

 

6 MUST FILL TRADING GAPS

6 MUST FILL TRADING GAPS

The last time I wrote about 6 Must Fill Trading Gaps was at the end of March, however our members were getting notifications in 2019 and into (01/3102/24, 2/28, and 3/02)  regarding Gaps and the potential consequences of ignoring them.

We all know what happens to the market if we ignore upside gaps…THE GAPS FILL TO THE DOWNSIDE.

The recent crash closed all the gaps dating back through 2018 before we started are ascent again.

I have been listening to the talking heads on Fox Business, CNN, Bloomberg, Yahoo Finance, and many others. The all ask if this rally is just a long journey back up to eventual new highs. Plain and simple, their answers must be scripted. I personally know 2 of them and they are intelligent and practiced and know that 91% of all Gaps fill.

These well trained “guru’s” can easily look to their charts and know whats coming.

If you have downloaded and read our Gaps guide, then you know the 6 Must Fill Trading Gaps are going to eventually close and are already prepared for it.

I was having a nice cold Bud chatting socially with my next door neighbor and he asked me when to expect the Gaps to fill. My answer is always the same so brace for it. “I have no clue.”

What is more important is the recognition that dating all the way back to 2018 all the gains you made were gone in a matter of a few weeks. Now that it has risen 50% from the bottom of the current decline, are you ready to fill those gaps near the bottom?

If you are not ready for a retest, then grab a self paying subscription, or a bottle of Rolaids because it is coming. At a rate higher than 91%, the Green Gaps in the chart above will refill which means the market is coming back down.

History proves it. 

If this is even remotely close to the typical decline dating back to the 1600’s, its best to avoid the declining and simply jump back in close to the bottom.

Another Leg Down?

Another Leg Down?

We have seen a hefty relief rally but does Another Leg Down loom? For those who are Wealth Maximizer Pro members, you have caught the nice profitable rally, contratulations.

I am seeing some “disturbing” signs that the market is very close to re-testing the lows that we previously have made, or, will it form another leg down loom?.

At the very least, it is 98% certain we will come to test the lows around 2250 at any moment in time. It is possible that we have another final leg down, and I believe that we likely will.

It is important for you to remain patient instead of panic buying and falling into bull trap.

During this last leg down, simultaneously, Gold and Silver will likely sell-off for liquidity reasons. People are now and will continue to liquidate their hidden savings.

Here’s why we know that the last leg down is coming:

The VIX remains incredibly elevated (60+) despite big pops in the markets and has not subsided. This tells you another sell-off is looming. Whats more, it’s supported by many other technical and fundamental factors.

For the market to continue up and ignore these factors would be unprecedented.

Prepare for another drop to the eventual bottom.

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